scraps of Combustible material

poem

music yields to an achingly
lyrical melody, in keeping
and consuming. it’s a sound
personified by the slippery
trilling strings represent the
main blazes. flutes and other
winds twinkle, throwing up
horns rise, and swirling
moans and screams in the
sparks. later magic fire
cause of its unusually fast
music, fire was more frantic
comes from the percussion
more sexual. it is the inspiration
with fire’s ambiguous nature
epitomized by what we could be
-dazzling

From an article in the December 2012 Smithsonian Magazine on fire as an element in music and art for a dVerse prompt

30 thoughts on “scraps of Combustible material

  1. “words twinkle, throwing up” why I loved that so much, the words literally barf out at times..Exactly what dadaist is about.. triple love this Kathleen.

  2. An achingly lyrical melody–this is my favorite kind of music, touching the soul. Great choice for your source here, so many powerful phrases knit together beautifully!

  3. by what we could be—-dazzling….absolutely love the close…as if we could be but are not for some reason….the percussion more sexual made me snicker too…ha….this had great flow for a cut up….nicely played….

  4. That’s a really nice pulling together of scintillating elements 🙂 It’s got a lot of sparkling, clear images that just pop out from the page. The way it hangs together almost creates a synaesthetic effect.

  5. that closure is just….dazzling…ha…very cool k. – love the idea of fire as an element in music and really love how it intermingles here with all the instruments..how it gives a certain character as well

  6. I enjoyed what you did with this. Amazing what one can do with words from a Smithsonian article. Smiles. The words carried me along from beginning to end. I liked the ending a lot, but henna ink mentioned that. A phrase that I especially liked was ‘flutes and other winds twinkle.’

  7. I LOVE the ending:

    “music, fire was more frantic
    comes from the percussion
    more sexual. it is the inspiration
    with fire’s ambiguous nature
    epitomized by what we could be
    -dazzling”

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